2020 - Dunbar Spring Neighborhood Foresters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Dunbar Spring neighborhood near campus is a wonderful example of sustainable practices for urban landscaping. They have built a community of neigborhood stewards who have planted more than 1600 native trees and shrubs, harvested millions of gallons of rainwater to irrigate the landscapes and reduce downstream flooding, and gathered resources to educate and inspire those in their own and other neighborhoods. Led by rainwater harvesting guru, Brad Lancaster, they call themselves the "Dunbar Spring Neighborhood Forester" and we admire and commend their inspiring work. 

 

 

To support their work, the Campus Arboretum, with donor support, hired an undergraduate student to work with the neighborhood foresters to create educational resources that empower and inspire planting, care, and use of urban trees.

 

Jamie Rike, B.S. in Biosystems Engineering,  Class of 2021 researched information on 10 native species found in the Dunbar Spring neigborhood. Ultimately, she created 10 web pages describing the botanical characteristics, sustainable management in the approriate water harvesting zone, harvesting practices, and practical uses of the produce each species provides. She then designed and had signs produced with QR codes that link back to these web pages. The signs are now installed in the community neighborhood allowing visitors and residents to walk around and scan the signs to learn on site about each plant. 

 

 

The pages for each plant can be found here:

  1. screwbean mesquite
  2. blue palo verde
  3. desert ironwood
  4. foothills palo verde
  5. chuparosa
  6. desert hackberry
  7. desert oregano
  8. canyon hackberry
  9. velvet mesquite
  10. whitethorn acacia

 

We are delighted to connect with these wonderful neighbors and thankful for the training provided to another Campus Arboretum intern. 

Date: 
September, 2020